Hiking in the Rainforest – our choices for the best hiking shoes and clothes

BillHiking

Sometimes our adventurous guests (and nearly all of them are) arrive at our inn without the preferred clothes and shoes to wear on the untamed trails which we recommend. Sometimes they call or email first but too often they show us their Tevas or trail running shoes after they get here and ask (looking down at their feet) if they would be ok. Packing for traveling is tricky. You need footwear that can do double-time. Most people bring Tevas and sneakers because they know they will be walking in the city, on the beach, or at the airport.  Of course you can wear anything on the approved “Disney” trails in the center of the rainforest where the visitor center is and where the hordes of tourists flock together. On those manicured and paved trails with the rest stops around each turn (to duck out of the rain) and the informative signs, you can wear flip-flops (called chancletas here) and shorts and have no problem. But on the Indiana Jones style trails we recommend at the rainforest inn (when asked by our guests for something adventurous) you would be in trouble. You have to wear long pants, consider a long-sleeved shirt and leather gloves. I also like to wear a good stout hat because I don’t like how the spider webs feel in my face nor denizens crawling in my hair. Also the hat is good for the constant rain (no little trail huts to duck into on the real jungle trails).

A poncho is really not necessary because they are hot and the hat takes care of most of the bother from our warm tropical showers. You might want to carry a small poncho or windbreaker for the high cool mountain rains. I recommend Tilly hat’s as they wash easily, pack well, and are comfortable. They are versatile hats that you can wear on the beach and sight seeing as well. For eyewear, you don’t need sunglasses in the jungle. You’re under the canopy and you want to be able to see trail markers and cool creatures (boas are very hard to spot with their camouflage).  Pants that are the kind you zip off the bottom legs are great especially for swimming if you don’t want to go natural (the swimming holes we send you to are way off the beaten path and it’s very unlikely there will be anyone seeing you). Shirts can be any of the new travel shirts. Long sleeves are best (you can roll them up). You have to protect your arms and legs because of the combination of razor grass and the “Christmas bush” which is in a few areas of some of the deep jungle trails. The Christmas bush has an intense poison ivy effect which in combination with the razor grass cuts could spoil your vacation. Please remember that we are talking about intense jungle treks not the manicured hikes that are also offered in the El Yunque rainforest. We can also recommend some easy hikes with open improved trails which are not in dense jungle but are under the canopy and are also only hiked by our guests (hopefully no former guests will post a blog saying how to get to some of these places).

The most important thing is to bring the right shoes. I wear a New Balance Minamus and absolutely love them. The sole has some little lugs which help keep you from slipping but the big advantage is how thin it is so the flexing action of your foot knocks the mud off and your foot can hug the elevations and textures of the trail. Hiking boots or trail running shoes just become caked mud ice skates. Laurie wears bright lime green and black inov-8 bare-grip 200 with the larger lugs that offers more thickness in the sole than my Minamus shoes. FourPicturesShe says (of my shoes) that if she wanted to go barefoot she would “go barefoot”. These shoes are pricy but worth it but less expensive than a good hiking boot. Laurie’s shoe is popular with rough terrain trail runners. The important thing is to find a shoe with a thin flexible sole that has widely spaced lugs. The inov-8 also has plenty of comfortable toe room. Both shoes hose off the mud easily and dry out with no damage. We stand them up on a small table with a fan on them overnight ready for our next early morning jungle escape. In the photo of the shoes the black shoes with the “N” are my New Balance Minamus, the lime green ones are Laurie’s Inov-8 bare grip 200. There are newer models of these shoes out now but just be sure the sole is thin and has some wide spaced lugs. Field hockey shoes (one of our guests wore those on a hike) work well too.

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About Bill

With my wife Laurie we are renovating an old family estate in the El Yunque rainforest of Puerto Rico to turn it into a bed and breakfast. Many years ago I was the editor of an entertainment magazine in Los Angeles and I studied journalism at the University of Nevada so all the grammatical (and spelling) errors are purely the fault of that edification.
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